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Christmas Carols: A criminological tale

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In previous years, on my blog post I reflected on The true message of Christmas whilst my colleague @paulaabowles reflected on a modern version of “A Christmas Carol” for the twenty-first century.  This year I shall be reflecting on the festive sounds that underpin the meaning of Christmas. Have we ever considered what lies beneath?

As “It’s the season to be jolly” and all of us feel “joy to the world” because “Born is the King of Israel” so “Glory to the new-born King” “And in his name all oppression shall cease”.  Carols are festive tunes that play on the radio, the shops and even some people humming them on the lifts on their way to work.  Little catchy tunes* that bring smile to those who hear then, teach them to their children and even heard during the festive meal at Christmas.  Some of these tunes are a seasonal staples that signify the start of an ever-expanding Christmas season and can be heard in shops as early as October.  Clearly the memorable tune makes it a great aid to remind people that they will need to spend more so that they can feel more involved in the joy that is professed in the lyrics.

These songs are so ingrained into our collective Zeitgeist that they need no introduction regardless of our religious affiliations, views on faith and spiritual beliefs.  Why are they so important and what do they signify?  The obvious is, their theme.  A somewhat religious message regarding Christmas.  It is almost ironic that behind that festive, joyful message there are some dark undertones.

The first carols appear during the Roman Empire, apparently inspired by Ambrose, the popular Bishop of Milan, who during his tenure oversaw the stopping of an entire sect of Christianity from disappearing.  His fame grew even further when he banned emperor Theodosius the I from entering the cathedral after the latter massacred thousands of people from Thessaloniki in an uprising.  He asked the emperor to do penance for his actions, thus setting a judicial jurisdiction over all men.  Clearly, he had a strong sense of justice, arguably reserved solely for those that agreed with his world view and dogma as he was against mixed marriages (people of different races and faiths), heretics (any kind) and of course Jews, setting an anti-Semitic ghost over Europe that haunt us to this day.

In later year, carols became a symbol of difference between the Catholics and Protestants with the Protestants having more of a taste for the cheerful music notes of the carols.  Those divisions carry the pains in many parts of the world, including the Emerald Isle that suffered from conflict for centuries.  Carols became the reaffirmation of a more “pleasant” Christianity when the puritans moved on and took their dour faith across the ocean.

So now after all those centuries of persecution and conflict, many of those have been forgotten and carols now are nothing more than a jingle that acts like a Pavlovian reminder to the new faithful on the way to worship in the modern cathedrals in Malls and Outlets.  Maybe next time we hum any of these carols we should spend some time to reflect on their history and perhaps reconcile their past by changing our attitudes.

The Thoughts from the Criminology Team wish Happy Holidays to all.

 

Verses included from “Joy to the World”, “O Holy Night” “The First Noel” “Hark The Herald Angel Sings”

 

*I am not too sure if you can still smile after hours of hearing the same tunes over and over as some people do who work in retail.

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